Beware of New Scams Related to Coronavirus – Part Two

Last month, we shared information from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) about new scams related to the Coronavirus. Unfortunately, according to the FTC, the scammers are not slowing down. They continue to take advantage of fears surrounding the Coronavirus. They’re setting up websites to sell bogus products, and using fake emails, texts, and social media posts as a ruse to take your money and get your personal information.

The emails and posts may be promoting awareness and prevention tips, and fake information about cases in your neighborhood. They also may be asking you to donate to victims, offering advice on unproven treatments, or contain malicious email attachments.

According to the American Bankers Association, these are the most common scams.

SCAMS happening right now!

  • Phishing and supply scams. Scammers impersonate health organizations and businesses to gather personal and financial information or sell fake test kits, supplies, vaccines or cures for COVID-19.
  • Stimulus check or economic relief scams. There are reports that the government will help to ease the economic impact of the virus by sending money by check or direct deposit. However, the government will NOT ask for a fee to receive the funds, nor will they ask for your personal or account information.
  • Charity scams. Fraudsters seek donations for illegitimate or non-existent organizations.
  • Delivery of malware through “virus-tracking apps” or sensationalized news reports.
  • Provider scams. Scammers impersonate doctors and hospital staff and contact victim claiming to have treated a relative or friend for COVID-19 and demand payment for treatment.
  • Bank/FDIC scams: Scammers impersonate FDIC or bank employees and falsely claim that banks are limiting access to deposits or that there are security issues with bank deposits.
  • Investment scams often styled as “research reports,” claiming that products or services of publicly traded companies can prevent, detect, or cure COVID-19.

If you are contacted on your phone or through email, remember to simply stop. Call us. We are able to answer your questions. Sadly, we’ve probably heard this before. Do not feel pressured to act quickly or offer money for someone you don’t know.

As always,

Stay safe and be well.

Bank Disclosures

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